Events

Join the Quiet Cities Summit 25 & 26 November 2014

The realisation of the environmental, economic and road safety benefits of delivering goods out-of-hours has taken many significant steps forward, driven largely through the work of the Noise Abatement Society through the landmark Quiet Delivery Demonstration Scheme (QDDS) trials developed by the NAS and the FTA in 2010 and sponsored by the Department for Transport, the London 2012 trials sponsored by Transport for London, and NAS’ own Silent Approach™ programme.

Working with the Freight Transport Association, Transport and Travel Research, and Transport Research Laboratory, NAS has proven time and again that with the use of a consistent methodology, including engaging with local authorities and residents, installing noise monitoring equipment, introducing driver charters and rigorous site assessments, positive results can be achieved, including the ultimate goal of out-of-hours deliveries without disturbance.

However, protecting the rights of residents is of paramount importance. Given the significant health and environmental gains to be made, it is critical to establish feasible and sustainable quiet out-of-hours delivery practices with increased investment from industry and positive co-ordinated input from all stakeholders. Doing so will also lessen daytime disturbance and enable quieter deliveries to become accepted as the norm. Introducing quiet delivery practices now, under strict guidelines and independent monitoring, ensures that the public will be protected throughout.

This is why the NAS are proud supporters of The Quiet Cities global summit – another important marker on this journey, laying the groundwork for more effective co-operation, knowledge sharing and skills development across the transport industry globally. To find out more visit quietcities.com

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DCLG Consultation on the Review of Government Planning Practice Guidance

While the NAS believes that there is a need for up to date guidance on noise we also advise that such guidance includes provision for and/or takes into account the following recommendations:

A. The strengthening of building regulations relating to noise pollution to create a single, national standard for the design and construction of homes and to improve acoustic protection in buildings, following a review of standards in comparable northern European countries.

B. Allowance for local authorities to refuse planning permission where noise in the completed development would be deemed to be excessive and cannot be cost effectively reduced.  New noise sensitive developments should not be created in places where occupants would be likely to resort to legal action against established economic activities which are otherwise acceptable.

C. The Code for Sustainable Homes should be updated, with noise protection included as one of the measures for sustainable building design, reflecting the importance of quiet buildings to the health and wellbeing of the occupiers.

D. Planning Policy should enable and encourage local communities to create and protect tranquil spaces and green squares and empower planners to consider the availability of conveniently located tranquil spaces when granting planning permission for homes in noisy environments.

E. The establishment of development zones, as part of the Code for Sustainable Homes, that create and maintain sufficient acoustic separation between residential and other noise sensitive uses, and noise generators (such as commercial and enterprise zones). This zoning should guide planning application considerations and allow residential and commercial (and other noise generating areas) to function successfully and cost effectively. Local authorities should be empowered to ensure that the economic, social and cultural benefits of land use mixing are secured without creating noise disturbance.

F.Government policy should encourage local authorities and third sector partners to test innovative approaches to tackling intractable local noise and soundscape problems, such as in the White Night West Street Story project designed and run jointly by the Noise Abatement Society and Brighton & Hove City Council; including through targeted funding for pilot projects covering noise prevention and other beneficial outcomes such as crime prevention and enhancing the urban environment.

G. The Government should establish a cross-sector, inter-disciplinary acoustic, academic, NGO and property industry task force to provide greater assistance to minimise the health effects of Low Frequency Noise, establish the impact this has on people and create a maximum exposure limit for householders. The task-force should be mandated to recommend updates to building regulations to protect residents in their homes from unnecessary noise disturbance.

H. The Government should strengthen building standards for schools to better address the impact of poor acoustics on educational attainment, building on the extensive research that has been conducted into this problem. These guidelines should set stricter minimum acoustic protection levels and lower maximum allowable noise levels for class rooms that should be followed by developers and architects when designing new schools, universities and colleges (and extensions to existing facilities) to create better learning environments.

I. The Government should introduce a new funding programme, to tackle poor noise insulation, which creates acute distress leading to neighbour conflicts in parts of the UK’s existing housing stock, in partnership with private sector funding and within the auspices of the ECO home improvement programme and the Code for Sustainable Homes. This would be complementary to the aims of the Green Deal and could be achieved at no additional cost using insulation that provides both acoustic and thermal properties.

Click here to read the full consultation response

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Consultation response to the Health Protection Agency workplan on noise and health

NAS’ detailed comments focus on the individual objectives of section 7. Examining gaps and options for HPA work. The Noise Abatement Society welcomes the opportunity to comment on this consultation, and the commitment of the Health Protection Agency to stepping up to the responsibility for developing a programme of work to address the impact of neighbourhood and environmental noise on public health.

Click here to read the full consultation response

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Noise Manifesto launched by Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool calling for urgent planning reform to start ‘Quiet Revolution’ in building design

Business leaders back call for ‘better planning laws, not just less planning laws’ 

Manifesto urges Government to boost noise protection as part of National Planning Policy Framework Review

Brighton, 15 February 2013 – As the Government prepares to slash planning red tape and axe up to 70 per cent of the UK’s planning laws, in response to the Taylor Review, a new Noise Manifesto has been launched calling for the Government to boost noise protection in homes and other buildings as part of the new National Planning Policy Framework.

Launched by The Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool, the world’s largest stonewool insulation manufacturer, and based on views expressed at The Noise Summit by more than 100 property, construction and acoustic industry leaders, the Noise Manifesto urges the Government to create better planning laws, not ‘just’ less planning laws.

Divided into actions for the Government and the property industry, the Noise Manifesto calls for minimum national standards of noise protection in buildings and lays the ground-work for a new Quiet Homes Standard to identify quieter homes, commercial and public buildings in the future.

In the face of numerous academic studies and a World Health Organisation report showing the serious effects on health, impact on children’s educational achievement and damage to quality of life caused by excessive noise in the built environment, the Noise Manifesto sets out a 14 point plan to address the issue.

Key recommendations in the Noise Manifesto include:

Create a single, national standard for minimum acoustic protection in the design and construction of buildings as part of the National Planning Policy Framework review and The Code for Sustainable Homes

Empower local authorities to refuse planning permission for developments that are deemed to create a noise issue in the finished buildings, as part of the Localism agenda

Create tranquil spaces in new developments to allow residents to enjoy quiet areas

Zone developments to separate commercial and residential buildings

Strengthen planning guidelines around noise protection in schools

Introduce a Quiet Homes Standard to identify buildings which meet minimum acoustic protection levels

Use Green Deal and Eco funding to also improve acoustic insulation as well as boost thermal efficiency in buildings

Improve training for architects to include modules on acoustic design

The Noise Manifesto is being supported by leading industry experts including Professor Bridget Shield, President of the Institute of Acoustics and Gloria Elliott, chief executive of the Noise Abatement Society and Quiet Mark, and is based on the views expressed by those attending the Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool Noise Summit on 20th November 2012. Hosted by TV presenter and architect George Clarke, The Noise Summit provided a forum for leading figures in the architecture, construction, acoustic and property professions to discuss new ways to combat noise pollution in the UK’s built environment.

Thomas Heldgaard, managing director of Rockwool stated: “We urge the Government to consider these points during its review of the National Planning Policy Framework and as part of the Code for Sustainable Homes. Noise is a massive problem and for too long planning laws and guidelines have often ignored its impact and the destructive effect noise has on lives, health and education.

“While we appreciate the Taylor Report’s desire to make the planning process simpler, we call on the Government to consider improving noise protection as part of this NPPF review process – to fail to do so is a massive wasted opportunity which will see millions of people continue to have their lives blighted by excessive noise. While we support axing unnecessary red tape the focus should be on making planning laws better, not just cutting them.”

Lisa Lavia, managing director of the Noise Abatement Society stated: “Noisy homes are a major problem across the UK, with numerous studies linking noise pollution with health issues.

“As the Government is already reviewing planning guidelines, we urge ministers to give the UK adequate planning rules that protect people from noise and create a level playing field for the property industry. Cutting planning red-tape is fine but we have to ensure that the Planning Framework we are left with is fit for purpose – without better noise protection this simply isn’t the case. It’s time the Government started a quiet revolution.

A series of leading industry figures have backed the aims of the Noise Manifesto and added their support to the call for the Government to boost noise protection standards in buildings as part of the National Planning Policy Framework Review:

Professor Bridget Shield, President of the Institute of Acoustics said: “It is well known that noise has a detrimental impact on people’s health, wellbeing and performance. The Institute of Acoustics welcomes the Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool’s manifesto and hopes that it will encourage the government to recognise the importance of the prevention and control of noise, particularly in relation to current changes in planning policy and guidelines.

“Many of our members are involved in the study and measurement of noise and its effects, and in developing and implementing noise control measures.  We believe that noise should move up the political agenda and be recognised as being a key component of planning and building policies and the sustainability agenda.”

Gloria Elliott, Chief Executive, Noise Abatement Society and Quiet Mark says: “When uninvited, sound invades your home, whether it be low frequency or excessively loud, it’s an unacceptable invasion of private space and can seriously affect health, ability to concentrate and general enjoyment of life. Planning legislation should give everyone protection by providing robust rules on proper levels of noise insulation. Whilst reviewing the NPPF, Government has a golden opportunity to improve the effectiveness of building regulations by radically improving insulation standards and their enforcement across the UK.”

The Noise Manifesto

Overview

On the 20th November 2012, over 100 experts from the architecture, construction, acoustic and property professions gathered in London for The Noise Summit, sponsored by Rockwool and the Noise Abatement Society, to  provide a forum to discuss new ways to combat noise pollution in the UK’s built environment.

This Noise Manifesto builds on the views expressed by the industry leaders at this event and calls for the Government and property industry to develop a new approach to tackle noise pollution in communities.

The Noise Manifesto is rooted in a large body of academic and industry research, and work from organisations such as the World Health Organisation, which have identified noise as a key contributor to cardiac problems, stress, poor academic attainment, neighbourhood disputes and low productivity.

There were a wide range of ideas suggested by participants at The Noise Summit to counter noise pollution problems but the points made in this Manifesto are those that the majority felt most passionately about. This Noise Manifesto is a blueprint for change.

We would like the Government to consider these points during its review of the National Planning Policy Framework, which will aim to streamline planning laws, potentially resulting in up to 7,000 rules being dropped.

While we appreciate the desire to make the planning process simpler, we urge the Government to consider improving noise protection as part of this NPPF review process.

The Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool urge the Government and the property industry to enact these Noise Manifesto recommendations and build a quieter future for our communities.

Actions for Government

1. As part of the National Planning Policy Framework review, based on the findings of the Taylor Report, we urge the Government to strengthen building regulations relating to noise pollution to create a single, national standard for the design and construction of homes and to improve acoustic protection in buildings, following a review of standards in comparable northern European countries.

2. A new planning policy should be developed as part of the NPPF review to allow local authorities to refuse planning permission, under the Localism agenda, where noise in the completed development would be deemed to be excessive and cannot be cost effectively reduced.  New noise sensitive developments should not be created in places where occupants would be likely to resort to legal action against established economic activities which are otherwise acceptable.

3.    The Code for Sustainable Homes should be updated, with noise protection included as one of the measures for sustainable building design, reflecting the importance of quiet buildings to the health and wellbeing of the occupiers.

4.   Planning policy should enable and encourage local communities to create and protect tranquil spaces and green squares and empower planners to consider the availability of conveniently located tranquil spaces when granting planning permission for homes in noisy environments as part of the Localism and Big Society agenda.

5.   New National Planning Policy Framework guidelines should encourage the establishment of development zones, as part of the Code for Sustainable Homes, that create and maintain sufficient acoustic separation between residential and other noise sensitive uses, and noise generators (such as commercial and enterprise zones). This zoning should guide planning application considerations and allow residential and commercial (and other noise generating areas) to function successfully and cost effectively. Local authorities should be empowered to ensure that the economic, social and cultural benefits of land use mixing are secured without creating noise disturbance.

6.  Government policy should encourage local authorities to test innovative approaches to tackling intractable local noise and soundscape problems, such as in the White Nights project run by Brighton and Hove Council, including through targeted funding for pilot projects. Government should encourage and enable partnerships between private and third sector partners, and Government agencies, covering noise prevention and other beneficial outcomes such as crime prevention and enhancing the urban environment.

7.  The Government should establish a cross-sector, inter-disciplinary acoustic, academic and property industry task force to provide greater assistance to minimise the health effects of Low Frequency Noise, establish the impact this has on people and create a maximum exposure limit for householders. The task-force should be mandated to recommend changes to building regulations to protect residents in their homes from Low Frequency Noise.

8. The Government should strengthen building standards for schools to better address the impact of poor acoustics on educational attainment, building on the extensive research that has been conducted into this problem. These guidelines should set stricter minimum acoustic protection levels and lower maximum allowable noise levels for class rooms that should be followed by developers and architects when designing new schools, universities and colleges (and extensions to existing facilities) to create better learning environments.

9. A new Noise Panel including external experts, as well as civil servants from across Whitehall should be established to assist Government in finding cost effective solutions to improving noise insulation and addressing noise issues within the spirit of the Big Society.

1  The Government should examine whether a new funding programme, to tackle poor noise insulation, which creates acute distress leading to neighbour conflicts in parts of the UK’s existing housing stock, would be possible, in partnership with private sector funding and within the auspices of the ECO home improvement programme and the Code for Sustainable Homes. This would be highly complementary to the aims of the Green Deal and could be achieved at no additional cost using insulation that provides both acoustic and thermal properties.

Actions for the Property Industry

1.    A Quiet Homes Standard should be introduced as an industry standard to identify homes that meet certain levels of build and design quality, and new homes should be marketed with information showing the level of acoustic protection they provide. This can either be a stand-alone Quiet Homes Standard or an adaption of the Quiet Mark™. The industry should also explore additional ways to help homeowners identify the acoustic performance of buildings, through labelling and information schemes.

2.  Minimum standards should be agreed as best practice by the property industry for sound insulation between floors and partition walls in flat conversions within existing houses and large buildings as part of a Quiet Homes Standard. This should include the industry agreeing how to integrate certification within wider building regulation compliance to create a structural and acoustic Best Practice guidance for new builds.

3. Training and degrees in architecture should include a mandatory module on acoustics and noise, with acoustic design a key part of professional qualification. This should include modules looking at the creative use of acoustics and ways to design soundscapes to encourage architects to create aurally innovative and tranquil spaces within developments. Training needs to go beyond giving traditional technical tuition on dB levels to encompass a more creative way to design acoustic environments and inspire a new generation of architects.

4. Auralisation techniques should be incorporated into the design process for all major infrastructure and residential/commercial/educational developments, including the relevant outdoor spaces that would be affected by these, to ensure the acoustic environment of the finished building(s) will meet the new Quiet Homes Standard. This auralisation process should be used to increase consumer knowledge and understanding of noise levels and their impact on finished buildings.

A vision for change

This Noise Manifesto reflects the views expressed at The Noise Summit and the views of The Noise Abatement Society and Rockwool on the best ways to address the issue of urban noise, develop better buildings and design quiet spaces and acoustically innovative areas in the built environment.

Building design that neglects to create a good acoustic environment frequently results in noise pollution which impacts on other residents and users of the building. Noise pollution is more than just a nuisance; it adversely affects health and wellbeing, negatively impacts quality of life leading to increased stress and lower productivity and is a growing and insidious problem in the UK.

The steps outlined in this Noise Manifesto provide a blueprint for change, and a foundation to drive quieter communities and cut noise pollution in homes, offices, schools and public buildings.

We believe a fresh approach to noise is needed. We urge the Government, property industry and local authorities to take up the baton and enact these recommendations and ensure that the new National Planning Policy Framework and is not just more efficient and streamlined but also that it, and the Code for Sustainable Homes, address the critical issue of noise in buildings and communities and provide new guidance and minimum standards for noise protection in the UK.

Rockwool and the Noise Abatement Society will be hosting a second Noise Summit in 2013 to look at how the industry can create better urban soundscapes and address the health, educational and lifestyle issues that excess noise creates.

‘It is time to start a quiet revolution’.

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Brighton & Hove and NAS are Sounding Brighton – “Exploring practical approaches towards better soundscapes”

On 18-19 June Brighton & Hove City Council, the EU COST Action TD0804 on “Soundscapes of European Cities and Landscapes” and the Noise Abatement Society hosted the second international soundscapes conference, ‘Sounding Brighton,’ exploring practical approaches towards better soundscapes, with workshops, installations, and a soundwalk.

Following on from the success of last year’s conference, Sounding Brighton brought together world environmental sound experts, in its home town of Brighton & Hove. The primary focus of the event was on soundscape issues relating to health and quality of life.

The event once again provided the opportunity to raise awareness and promote communication on soundscapes among the general public and facilitated exchange between international soundscape experts involved in the EU COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology), Eurocities and the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) networks; and policy makers, academics, scientists and local people. It also explored new ways of listening and assessing local sounds, as well as innovative methods for tackling noise through local town planning.

Professor Jian Kang, of Sheffield University and Chair of the EU COST Action TD0804 on “Soundscapes of European Cities and Landscapes” said: “Reducing sound levels, the focus of EU environmental noise policy, does not necessarily lead to improved quality of life in urban/rural areas, and a new multidisciplinary approach is essential. Soundscape research represents this paradigm shift as it involves not only physical measurements but also the co-operation of human/social sciences (e.g. psychology, sociology, architecture, anthropology, medicine).”

Brighton & Hove City Council leader Jason Kitcat said: “The Soundscapes project is unique in the way it brings together experts in their field and local people to explore the different aspects of sound, how it relates to people and how we can improve quality of life in the city.

“The conference informed the council’s work on finding practical ways of improving public spaces, managing noise where it is having a negative impact and designing environments with soundscapes that can actually improve people’s wellbeing.”

Lisa Lavia, Managing Director of the NAS said: “Soundscape can be best described as the acoustic environment as perceived and understood by people, in context and regards sound as an important environmental resource to be managed and cared for. Sounding Brighton is an ambitious project led by Brighton & Hove City Council and the NAS, which will ultimately benefit the city and serve to showcase how innovative and forward thinking can lead to healthy, pleasant soundscapes.”

The workshop presentations included analysis of Sounding Brighton sonic installations staged during White Night, the city’s all night arts and cultural festival, on 29 October 2011, including a ground breaking pilot experiment using the soundscape to help enhance public safety and improve crowd behaviour on West Street. It involved Martyn Ware of the Illustrious Company and founder of the Human League and Heaven 17; psychobiologist Dr Harry Witchel of Brighton and Sussex Medical School, and film and broadcast specialists Driftwood Productions.

Also included was a review of a survey of local residents on their experience of local sounds in a city-wide online Sounding Brighton Survey conducted last year in conjunction with the University of Stockholm. The gathered international experts helped to propose a range of soundscape options for the council’s improvement of areas such as Brighton station, the seafront, foreshore, historic terraces, squares, lanes, parks and gardens.

To enable the public to better understand and interact with some of the concepts being presented to the city, a ‘Sounding Brighton’ free-entry poster and video installation also opened to the public on Monday 18th June for one week before being on display in other European cities.

For more information email soundscape@noise-abatement.org

 

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NAS Response on the Consultation on the Code of Practice on Noise from Ice-Cream Van Chimes,1982

Today we have lodged our response to Defra to their Consultation on the Code of Practice on Noise from Ice-Cream Van Chimes, Etc., 1982.

While the Society welcomed the opportunity to respond to the consultation, we were extremely surprised and concerned not to have our views sought during the pre-consultation process described in section 2.13 of the Consultation Document. As the UK’s only registered Charity who’s sole remit is to find solutions to noise pollution problems, we were at a loss to understand how a reasonable review of “noise stakeholders” could not have included the NAS.

We also expressed our concern that Paragraph 2.13 of the Consultation Document is prejudicial, referring to “initial discussions with noise stakeholders that suggest that they are not overly concerned by a relaxation of the Code”. Government should not prejudge the positions of stakeholders on the basis of cursory discussions in which people may be reserving their positions in the context of Prime Ministerial comments which may themselves be considered prejudicial.

We also fail to understand how a consultation on adding more noise into sensitive environments benefits anyone or is aligned with any of the principles, aims or objectives of the Government’s Noise Policy Statement for England.

The NAS would like to go on record to clearly state that it does not support the view of other “noise stakeholders”, as stated in Section 2.13 of the Consultation Document, of being “not overly concerned by the relaxation of the Code”. The exact opposite is true.

The use of chimes in public streets is a form of aggressive selling and noise pollution that would not be countenanced for other industries. It abuses and seeks to bypass the relationship between children and their parents/guardians, exploiting the ‘pester power’ of children.

It is especially irresponsible to encourage such selling practices of ‘fast food’ and sugary treats for children. Parents may be concerned at child obesity, encouraging healthy eating and may want to protect their children from aggressive selling and the attendant peer pressure from other children. People can usually get ice cream from plenty of other outlets, including convenience shops and supermarkets, which do not use inane noise pollution to force their attention on citizens who have a basic human right to peace and quiet in their own homes.

As has been well documented in numerous studies, noise can cause annoyance and fatigue, interfere with communication and sleep, reduce efficiency and damage hearing. Long undisputed by practitioners and underpinned by the World Health Organisation in its report Burden of disease from environmental noise, quantification of healthy life years lost in Europe (World Health Organization 2011, www.euro.who.int), “the health impacts of noise are a growing concern among both the general public and policy-makers in Europe”.

The WHO report presents a summary of “synthesized reviews of evidence on the relationship between environmental noise and specific health effects, including cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance and tinnitus”.

It shows that “with conservative assumptions applied to the calculation methods, estimated DALYs lost from environmental noise were 61 000 years for ischaemic heart disease, 45 000 years for cognitive impairment of children, 903 000 years for sleep disturbance, 22 000 years for tinnitus and 587 000 years for annoyance in the European Union Member States and other western European countries”.

Callers to the NAS’ National Noise Helpline give a human voice to these findings with their appeals for help heard on a daily basis:

‘Ever since we moved in my life has been hell. I don’t want to go home sometimes but there’s nowhere else to go.’

‘I am a prisoner in my own home because of noise.’

‘I can no longer tolerate the noise. I have not slept properly in weeks.’

It is not unusual for highly distressed callers to the Helpline to cry on the phone.

It is against this backdrop of our own experience, those of the callers to our helpline and the considerable evidence as to the adverse health effects of noise pollution, that it is NAS’ strong view that given the many disturbances that residents are already required to put up with in the built environment, there is no justifiable reason to encourage unnecessary noise disturbance in order to encourage unhealthy eating practices amongst the young and the attendant health risks this will engender later in life.

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2 Responses to NAS Response on the Consultation on the Code of Practice on Noise from Ice-Cream Van Chimes,1982

  1. Derek Hunt says:

    I hope the govement are forced to do a U-turn.

    This is outragus proposel to expose residents in the home enrionment to increased noise levels.

    Are homes our santury from unwanted noise polution. I loth this kind commercial audio postuering for business “Ban the Chimes for the health and welbing of the Citizens”

  2. Fay Davies says:

    Good, i totally agree with the campaign. If the chimes could be banned altogether that would be even better, but unlikely I feel, A van comes round regularly in my road playing Boys and Girls come out to play (yes it is recognisable) and the children and even adults go rushing out for ice cream. They must all have freezers where ice cream can be kept, so i am amazed because this is also a more expensive way of buying ice cream, so not good value for money,. The van often plays the chimes very loud and over the time allowed at present. The owner can be abusive if challenged and it does make one look a spoil sport in front of the neighbours.
    Keep trying!

    Fay Davies

Supporting Noise Action Week

We’re supporting Noise Action Week which started on Monday, and thought you might like to join the quiet revolution and win a peaceful summer with Quiet Mark, the NAS mark of approval for quiet machines and appliances.

There is £8000 worth of luxury quiet products to be won this month including the ultimate luxurious weekend Spa-break for two at the exquisite new Corinthia Hotel London in heart of the capital.

Win a quiet kitchen with the latest premium Swiss dishwasher from V-ZUG, and washing machines from Panasonic.

Win a quiet garden with a leaf blower spring cleaning kit from STIHL that won’t disturb the neighbours.

If that all sounds like too much hard work, why not check out the next generation Automower Robotic Lawnmower from Husqvarna? It does the hard work for you – quietly.

And to round off your perfectly peaceful weekend, we have the latest Sennheiser NoiseGuard headphones or escape the stress altogether with 20th Century Fox DVDs of 2011 Palme d’Or winner Tree of Life starring Brad Pitt and Sean Penn.

To take part visit our Facebook - Twitter - Quiet Mark Website

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Sounding Brighton at White Night

6.00pm Saturday 29 October to 10.00am Sunday 30 October

Sounding Brighton 2011, as part of the contemporary, free arts festival, White Night, will be presenting several innovative, participatory installations aimed at encouraging members of the community to expand their creative engagement with sound. It will raise awareness of new possibilities for quality soundscapes through immersive sonic experiences, using artistic and musical interpretations. There will also be a programme of interactive lectures.  

Listen to Gloria Elliott on the subject - 19/10/2011 BBC Radio 4 Midweek

WEST STREET STORY – a 3D outdoor soundscape installation, transforming the atmosphere and ambience in the heart of Brighton’s cacophonous clubbing area 

The installation is being created by Martyn Ware of The Illustrious Company. Martyn, a founder member of The Human League and Heaven 17, is a musician committed to helping the public understand positive soundscaping. Situated in part of West Street, in the heart of Brighton’s night life, his installation will consist of two rows of speakers creating a 3D soundscape, through which people can walk. Martyn will present a combination of both recorded and live sounds from a kiosk at the side of the street. His soundscapes will present a contrast to the raucous disharmony so frequently heard in lively areas at night, and will be designed to connect with visitors to the area and residents, as well as those exiting the clubs. 

COME TOGETHER – a special event exploring ‘sound and rapport’, in Brighton University’s Sallis Benney Theatre, Grand Parade Campus

Audio from West Street Story, and live film footage of the crowds in the West Street area,will be broadcast by Driftwood Productions at Come Together. Here, psychobiologist and communications expert Dr Harry Witchel will facilitate three entertaining, interactive, masterclasses about Body Language, Music and Social Territory. These will enable participants to analyse the effects of the soundscape on the body language and behaviour of people in general, as well as those filmed during White Night. Dr Witchel, from Brighton and Sussex Medical School, is alsowell known as a media personality and body language commentator for Big Brother. He is author of You Are What You Hear.  

In the adjoining gallery, Brighton University is staging Sounding out the Museum – Peter Vogel Retrospective Exhibition, the first exhibition in the UK of Vogel’s pioneering and influential sound sculptures, which are activated by the movement, gestures and sound emanating from audiences as they enter the space.                                                                     

INTERACTIVE LECTURES IN BRIGHTON’S INDEPENDENT COFFEE HOUSES

Julian Treasure and Dr John Drever, both sound experts, will run discussions, as part of a wider programme for White Night involving independent minded thinkers. They will demonstrate how certain sounds, which are fitting in one space, are disturbances in another.   

Julian Treasure of The Sound Agency will discuss Utopia Sounds: In our louder and louder world, he asks “Are we are losing our listening?” Julian will share ways to re-tune our ears for conscious listening – to other people and the world around us.  

In Creation Power, Dr John Drever from Goldsmiths, University of Londonwill illustrate how designers of gadgets and machines, and the individuals using them, should be aware of the impact of sounds associated with these products and the ways in which they affect people – and spaces.

BRIGHTON REMIXED: Soundscape installation, Imperial Arcade

Esther Springett, sound artist and facilitator, is working with Dv8 Training Brighton, who run innovative, creative and media based training for young people. Esther is helping a group of 16-18 year olds to explore their own soundscapes, listen in new ways and learn practical, technical skills, which will open up new opportunities for them in the creative industries. Their White Night soundscape installation, the culmination of this vocational based learning project, will feature their recordings ‘remixing the sounds of Brighton’, presented through an audiovisual display.

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SoundScape Ezine – what it means to the NAS

Have you heard?

SoundScape has launched.

We have received many messages of thanks and support from people who have already explored SoundScape and enjoyed its articles and design – we look forward to hearing your thoughts.

If you have pre-registered you should be receiving a copy in your inbox any minute now!

If not, it is available here for all to read.  

SoundScape is the first publication of its kind and was born out of the current need to reconnect with the aural environment. Being aware of the sounds around us, their context and potential, is beneficial to everyone’s emotional, social and physical wellbeing.

The magazine brings to the fore technologies, strategies and products that believe in noise mitigation as a core benefit. It offers practical advice for those affected by noise as well as those who affect solutions to noise, whilst championing industry best-practice.

 This launch issue pulls into focus the work of real life heroes and warns of a ticking “time-bomb” that will destroy our current teenagers’ hearing if they do not learn to listen responsibly to their mp3 players. Also featured are perceptive opinion pieces on the state of domestic noise in Britain and the need to establish and protect sound ecosystems.

 Holistic and pragmatic, SoundScape perfectly reflects the ethos of the NAS. 

“SoundScape intelligently investigates the sounds that affect our lives. Professors, scientists, activists, designers, parliamentarians and public alike, share their views, experiences and hopes for the future of our aural ecology”, explains Gloria Elliott, NAS chief executive. “We are all affected by noise, and this publication puts the pollutant into context, bringing in to focus how we can positively change and enhance our soundscape, for the benefit of our health, work and community.”

Let us know what you think. Email us at soundscape@noise-abatement.org

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Noise 2010: Developing better practice through collaborative working

Thursday 16th September 2010 – London

The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health is offering, in partnership with the Noise Abatement Society, this one-day conference designed to help you develop successful and cost-effective collaborative approaches between local authority departments and other industry experts, enabling you to combat the issues of noise pollution and control.

This conference has been designed specifically for those with a professional interest in noise management including EHPs, Heads of noise teams, Planners, Night time delivery managers, Heads/managers of supermarkets and other organisations that operate night time deliveries, Noise reducing technology providers and Noise instrument suppliers.

Key issues covered throughout the day will include:

Maximising budgets for local authorities and other industry organisations

Effective use of the Licensing Act and other available measures of enforcement

The sustainability debate: Which environmental health issues take priority?

Understanding the environmental impacts of sustainable developments

Night-time deliveries and related transport issues

The planning application process and the importance of communication

Balancing the needs of community stakeholders

Effectively managing cases of anti-social behavior and related noise nuisance

Sharing best practice, encouraging collaboration and optimising resources

Noise 2010 is packed with legislative updates and guidance as well as practical sessions covering enforcement and new technology.

For more information please click here or visit the CIEH website http://www.cieh.org/events/noise2010.html

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